Science of Longevity: How Anyone Can Reduce Age-Related Decline

There is so much advice on longevity and aging that it can be hard to sort through all of the information. Today we dive into the science-backed approaches for living a longer and healthier lifeValter Longo, Ph.D., has thirty years of experience in longevity and healthy eating, and is one of the world’s experts in the field.  In this episode we discuss:

  • Why centenarians might not be the best source of health advice
  • How the fasting-mimicking diet works without needing to change normal food habits
  • Insulin, IGF-1 and mTOR: The three most important factors in accelerating the aging process
  • Senolytic effects of FMD
  • Psychological aspects of eating
  • The clinical trials Prof. Longo is conducting on on age-related decline

Growth hormone controls insulin, IGF-1, and mTOR, which we think are the 3 most important factors in accelerating the aging process. -Valter Longo, PhD

Stay tuned to learn more about a forward-thinking approach to longevity. We hone in on methods that anyone can take on, no matter what your current lifestyle is.

Related Links:
Valterlongo.com
Create Cures Foundation

 

Listen here:

 

 

Guest Bio:

Valter Longo, Ph.D., has thirty years of experience in the field of longevity and healthy eating,
and is one of the world’s experts in the field following in the footsteps of his mentor and head
Roy Walford, pioneer of studies concerning healthy longevity. Valter Longo is currently Professor
of Biogerontology and Biological Sciences and Director of the Institute of Longevity of the
School of Gerontology at the University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles as well as Director of the Oncology and Longevity Program at IFOM (FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology)
in Milan. Professor Longo is also the scientific director of the Create Cures Foundation and the
Valter Longo Foundation.

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